Radio Beatkolektif

Twerps “Range Anxiety”

Formed in Melbourne in late 2008, Twerps enjoyed immediate success, releasing a series of vinyl singles and cassettes on various labels around the world. Their 2011 self-titled debut album was recorded with producer Jack Farley at Head Gap, marking the band’s first foray into a “bona fide” recording studio. The release of Twerps led to appearances at SXSW and CMJ and tours with Real Estate, Mac DeMarco, and others. Not wanting to wait until 2015 to unleash new songs on present and future fans, Twerps quickly recorded the delightful Underlay EP, which Pitchfork described as “songs fraught with universal, emotionally familiar sentiments.” And now, Merge brings you Twerps’ second full-length album, Range Anxiety. Also recorded with Jack Farley, its title refers to a debilitating fear of running out of gas-both literally and metaphysically. As singer-guitarist Julia McFarlane explains, “The title Range Anxiety is both descriptive and comic. The album at times feels like it was built on uncertainties; some purely practical and some emotional obstacles were present around the start of writing.” Twerps are a very collaborative band, with most songs being written in rehearsal rooms. “Obviously, we write the lyrics separately, but the band is best when everyone is being creative,” muses Julia. “Rick and Alex are big voices in the stylistic direction of the band. Rick is a genuinely curious mind and also a vast library of musical reference. As a graphic designer, he has a much more sophisticated ability to interpret and articulate ideas than most people I know, and he has introduced Martin and me to some of Twerps’ most coveted influences. Bringing Alex to the band also meant introducing another songwriter. He probably has made ten more records than us collectively and has been a real burst of energy in the band due to his militant work ethic and enthusiasm for productivity.” Range Anxiety is a worthy showcase of the creativity and vitality Twerps bring to their music. At first listen, nods to The Go-Betweens and the band’s beloved Flying Nun influences are clear, but upon closer examination, Twerps expand into a sound uniquely their own.